Archive for February, 2009

Pro Tools 201

This past weekend I completed the 201 part of my Pro Tools certification course,bringing me 3/4 of the way to being Operator certified, bringing me untold amounts of riches, women, and creative output.  But while this all sounds exciting, I think I can calm down long enough to reflect on 201 and share these reflections with you all.  Again I am struck by the depth that Pro Tools inhabits.  The editing features, of which I have always been impressed with, I now see as more powerful than ever.  Pro Tools is definitely the best editing software that lives in the highly competitive audio software market (audio editor that is… Pro Tools continues to be way behind the curve when it comes to MIDI editing… although I have heard intersting things about Pro Tools 8).  The selection modification tools and the region editing in particular were useful knowledge to add, and I have quickly adopted them into to normal workflow while using Pro Tools.

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However, I do have some gripes about Pro Tools 201.  Firstly, now that I have completed 201, which was a nicely organized and thought out course, I can, in retrospect, criticize the 110 course even further.  The 110 Pro Tools certification course was a big pile of gobbedelygook.  It was as if the editor had dropped the 110 manuscript as he was on his way to devliver it, quickly picked up the dropped pages, and then turned it in to the publishers (publishing responsibilities fall squarely on Digidesin, who have decided to publish this entire course on their own).  201 was nicely set up in comparison, and transitioned nicely from section to section.  Where 201 did have some shortcomings, though, was in it’s content.  One would expect that the Pro Tools courses would get progressively more difficult and gain more depth, but the 201 course barely was not nearly as challenging as the first two.  This may have been because 201 focuses primarily on HD level systems which I have had quite a bit of experience with, but at times, 201 felt more like an argument for buying HD systems over LE and M-Powered systems (Although the same blatant advertising can be found on all three of the courses I have taken so far).

Still, all in all, I feel like my investment in the Pro Tools courses have been worth it.  My workflow has gotten considerably faster already, and the more work I do, more of the concepts that I’m learning about become all the more relevant.  My biggest concern is that, with the ridiculous quantities of information covered in such a short period of time in these courses, I hope the most imortant information comes back to me when I’m under the gun.

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Coke Commercial

I am delighted to say that the commercial that I have been working on (see “Adventures on the Wacky Worm”, “How to Build a Transformer”, and “The Wrecking Crew of Sound Design”) has been posted online.  The commercial is for Coke and it is part of a nationwide competition.  Ten finalists were selected from an un-Godly amount of submissions based on plot idea and animatic.  The finalists then had a short amount of time to build a fifty second commercial for Coke.  The best of these 10 finalists (as decided by a panel of judges) is to be selected on February 21 and will then play at every movie theatre in the universe for a while before every movie (because the real reason we spend our hard-earned-dough on the movies is obviously to watch commercials).

Check out the commercial by clicking on the picture below, click on the “2009 Finalists” tab and then click on “Here We Go!”

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The storytellers tried to put a bit too much story into fifty seconds and the visual effects guys may have dropped the ball, but, if I do say so myself, my team of three did a damn good job on the sound design.  Especially cool is the  fact that the vast majority of the sound design, including transforming roller coasters, a studio wall crash, and a roller coaster lift off was done with a lot of original sound effects- stuff we recorded.  We also recorded the band Blue of Noon who did a great job with the sound track.  Go on and check it out.